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Top 10 Signs and Symptoms of Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia is a condition where a person’s blood sugar level is too high. Although this can happen to anyone, it is of particular concern to diabetes patients. Hyperglycemia is caused by resistance to insulin or loss of insulin producing cells. In most cases, the body is usually unable to produce an adequate amount of insulin to metabolize glucose in the bloodstream. This can happen when people with diabetes eats to much of the wrong food or forget to take their diabetes medication.

Self-monitoring and good management of blood sugar levels is the key to preventing hyperglycemia especially for people who’ve already been diagnosed with diabetes. If you’ve not been diagnosed with diabetes, you should report any symptoms of hyperglycemia to a doctor in order to be tested for diabetes and other conditions that can lead to hyperglycemia. High blood sugar should be controlled in order to prevent chronic hyperglycemia and complications that may be caused by the condition.

The Most Common Signs and Symptoms of Hyperglycemia Include:

  1. Increased Hunger

symptoms of high blood sugar

This condition is also known as polyphagia and it simply means that you’re experiencing increased hunger. Therefore, you may find yourself feeling hungry and wanting to snack shortly after eating even when you had previously managed to easily limit your snacking especially between meals. Polyphagia is caused by the reduced ability of your body to metabolize glucose. Since glucose is a very important nutrient for all cells in our bodies, when they become malnourished, they usually signal the body that they need more food to maintain proper functioning, resulting in feelings of hunger.

  1. Increased thirst

The medical term for this symptom is polydipsia. The kidneys normally absorb sugar in the bloodstream in order to recycle it and make it readily available to supply our blood cells. However, when there’s too much sugar in the blood stream, the kidneys are overworked but they may still be unable to keep up. When the kidneys are unable to absorb glucose, they discard it by simply excreting it in urine. This usually results in increased urination which often causes dehydration and you may end up feeling thirsty.

  1. Increased Urination

This symptoms that is impossible or very difficult to ignore. The medical term for increased urination is polyuria. It simply refers to a noticeable increase in the volume of urine passed, frequency of urination, or both. Hyperglycemia results in excess sugar in the blood stream causing the kidneys to discard it in urine. Therefore, the kidneys must work extra hard and this inevitably results in more urine or frequent urination.

  1. Blurred Vision and Eye Damage

High blood sugar levels cause the lenses in our eyes to swell. On the other hand any change in the size or shape of the lenses causes significant changes in vision which usually result in blurry vision. This problem should be addressed as soon as it arises because it can cause permanent changes in your vision.

  1. Weight Loss

Although weight loss does not sound like a logical outcome especially when you think of excess glucose in the bloodstream, it can actually happen and it makes sense when the process is broken down. Remember, the body is unable to process the glucose in the bloodstream. Therefore, the cells that need nourishment in form of glucose do not get it. The body responds by tapping into the fat reserves stored in different area in order to use it for energy. As these reserves are gradually depleted, weight loss occurs.

  1. Slow Healing Cuts and Wounds

The healing function for people with hyperglycemia can be slowed quite dramatically. Healing can be slower than normal for more than one reason. Blood vessels can become narrowed due to high glucose levels and this can reduce blood flow hence causing slower healing. The negative effect of high glucose on red blood cells can also slow the healing process. This is a very dangerous condition because wounds that take longer to heal are more susceptible to other infections.

  1. Dry Mouth

This condition is also known as xerostomia. Dry mouth can result due to the negative impact of high blood sugar levels on the salivary glands. It can cause significant difficulty with both eating and swallowing. For people who wear dentures, this condition can make it very difficult for them to keep their dentures in place and they are also more likely to develop sores. Moreover, since saliva is very important for the health of gums and teeth, people with dry moth are also more likely to develop other dental problems.

  1. Itchy or dry skin

Dry skin can be caused by the reduction of moisture due to high blood sugar levels. Since nerve damage is also another potential complication of high blood sugar levels, it can also interfere with the body’s ability to perspire and this also dries the skin. It is very important to understand that dry skin is generally more prone to itching and cracking, which increases the risk of injury. The reduced ability of the patient’s body to heal itself can make this a very serious condition because of the high risk of infection.

  1. Irregular Heartbeat

Irregular heartbeat is also known as cardiac arrhythmia. High blood glucose levels can deplete the supply of potassium, which is very important especially when it comes to maintaining a healthy and regular heartbeat. This is the primary reason that higher blood sugar levels can cause cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat).

  1. Seizures

This is a potentially dangerous and frightening symptom. Seizures are triggered by hyperglycemia in some people. Since normal brain function mainly relies on a steady supply of nutrient-rich and oxygen-rich blood, hyperglycemia can interfere with the delivery of oxygen and vital nutrients hence triggering seizures in some individuals. However, it’s essential to understand that the likelihood of seizures varies from person to person.

Your blood sugar level may rise if you forget or skip your oral glucose-lowering medication or insulin, eat too many carbohydrates, are ill, are under stress, have an infection, exercise less or become inactive, or when you engage in strenuous physical activity when your insulin levels are low and blood glucose levels are high. However, you shouldn’t worry about hyperglycemia if you keep your blood glucose levels under control by following your exercise program, meal plan and medicine schedule.

Read here for more on Blood Sugar Levels!

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The American Diabetic Diet

More than 1 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes each year and more than 200,000 deaths are attributed to the disease. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, or simply want to take better care of how you eat is to your advantage to follow the diet for diabetic Americans, in order to keep the diabetes under control.

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes must learn to follow a diet plan for diabetics to stay healthy. Following the plan of good eating, such as the American Diabetes Diet, diabetic patients are able to effectively control blood sugar without medication.

good foods for diabetics

The reason for the American diet for diabetics is so highly effective is because it covers all food groups. The American diabetic diet plan recommends foods high in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats and low in saturated fat. Most of the calories recommended in the American diet come mainly carbohydrates diabetes, second from fat, and protein.

The American Diabetes diet should be followed every day and made the following recommendations:

  • 5 Servings of fruits and vegetables (spinach, broccoli and carrots
  • 6 Servings whole grains (cereals, bread and pasta)
  • 2 Servings (meat, fish or chicken)
  • Dairy products (eggs, skim milk, nonfat cheese, yogurt, even ice cream low fat)

Every persons makeup is different, so are their bodily needs. Some of us require the consumption of calories.

American Diabetic Diet Plan for those who need 1200-1600 calories include:

  • Three servings fruits and vegetables
  • Two servings of milk, yogurt and meat
  • Three servings of fatty
  • Six servings of starches

The American Diabetes diet plan for people who need 1600-2000 calories include:

  • Three fruit serving
  • Four servings of vegetables
  • Two servings of milk, yogurt and meat
  • Four servings of fatty
  • Eight servings of starches

The  diabetic diet menu for those who need 2000-2400 calories include:

  • Three servings fruit
  • Four servings of vegetables
  • Two servings of milk, yogurt and meat / br> <
  • Five servings of fatty
  • Eleven-portions of starches

The popular belief is that people with diabetes should not eat sweets. This is not always so. The American Diabetes diet recommends eating fresh, but in limited quantities. It’s important to eat low-calorie desserts or artificial sweeteners as a sugar substitute.

This particular diet plan is not only useful for people with diabetes, but for everyone. People with diabetes have the same nutritional needs as anyone else. And also the need for regular exercise is the same for people with diabetes as for those without.

The integration of the Diabetes exercise and diet, along with individually prescribed medications are essential to controlling diabetes. Have a well balanced diet and choose the right kind of foods, the diabetic patient can move the glucose to normal levels.

Controlling the blood glucose levels is the main objective of following the diabetic diet for Americans.

Be healthy and live a longer and happier life through the American diabetic diet. Before the commencement of any diet plan, it’s a good idea to consult your health care provider.

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Blood Sugar Levels, Diabetes and You!

The battle against diabetes in the United States is constant. Type 2 diabetes for the over 40 years category is more common because of increasing obesity which is largely due to the typical American diet. We eat more refined foods and fast foods and we are not getting the exercise that we need. It’s astonishing that almost half of the US Population, either have diabetes, or fall into the Prediabetes category. BUT the best news about this diabetes epidemic is that it’s almost entirely preventable!

Here’s just a few tips when Opting for Fast Food.

  • Make sure to check out the “healthy options” on the menu, when visiting the big take-out chains.
  • Noodles area great choice, but make sure you choose an option with an accompaniment low in fat, like veges lean meat or fish.
  • Japanese food is a great choice – there’s rice rolls with fish or vegetables, sashimi and sushi.
  • Always opt for boiled rice rather than Fried rice.
  • Try to avoid the sauces offered for salads and other foods – they can contain as much calories as the meal itself
  • Go for the wholegrain bread and roll variety where it’s offered.
  • Drink water, or a no sugar version of soda.
  • Avoid hot dogs, pies, pastries and fries.

More HERE on Healthy food for Diabetics!

Can Diabetes be Reversed with Diet and Exercise

In type 2 diabetes, just like with your diet, the exercise program you choose needs to have goals that are achievable, but also rigorous enough to provide health benefits. If you have recently been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, there’s a good chance you haven’t exercised for quite some time. So take it slow to start! Around 30 minutes per day to start is good – but if you find you can’t manage that all in one stint, then you can certainly break it up into 3 smaller sessions that you can manage.

  • Walking every day is a great place to start.  Just start out with 15 minutes per day and build as you start to improve fitness.
  • Try and arrange to walk with a friend
  • Try to increase your daily activity levels in general – by walking the stairs instead of taking the elevator. Parking a little further away from the grocery store and walking the extra.
  • Get yourself a pedometer to count your steps and motivate you to reach your set goals for the day.
  • Join a gym or an exercise class. This is good as  you will have a class leader to follow, and also there would be someone to help in the event of an emergency.

how to control diabetes with food and exercise

Managing your Blood Glucose Levels.

Just as regular exercise is an essential part of controlling your diabetes, keeping regular checks on your Blood sugar levels is equally important for type 2 diabetes . Take steps to maintain its range.

Use a Blood Glucose Meter to make random checks of your blood sugar levels several times during the day. There are many types of blood glucometers available. Choose one you like and use as indicated several times a day to record your levels.

 

Signs of Hyperglycemia.how to control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise

  • The excessive thirst,
  • frequent urination
  • blurry vision.
  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Headaches

Signs of Hypoglycemia.

  • nervousness,
  • tremors or signs of weakness,
  • fainting
  • Excessive Hunger
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Can Moderate Consumption of Alcohol Lower Diabetes Risk?

According to researchers in Denmark, drinking alcohol – three to four days per week, can reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Researchers in Denmark examined alcohol consumption patterns and found that people who drink moderately on three to four days per week are less likely to develop diabetes compared with abstainers. Wine is particularly beneficial because it is rich in compounds that help maintain blood sugar balance. The findings were published in the journal Diabetologia and the study was conducted by researchers from the University of Southern Denmark.

Diabetes arises when the body’s ability to use or make insulin is impaired. If this chronic disease is not controlled, it can result in hyperglycemia and this can cause serious damage to various organs in the body especially the eyes, heart, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels. The proportion of people living with diabetes worldwide has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to .5% in 2014.

In 2015, 1.6 million deaths were directly attributed to diabetes and high blood sugar was responsible for another 2.2 million deaths.

So Can Alcohol Lower Diabetes Risk?

can alcohol lower diabetes risk

Studies that have explored the relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of developing diabetes have established that moderate to light consumption is linked to lower risk compared to abstaining. However, most of these studies have only examined the volume of consumption without looking at how the volume of consumption is spread over time.

The Danish researches also noted that although other studies explored drinking patterns such as number of drinking days each week and the effects of various types of alcoholic, their findings were inconclusive. Therefore, they decided to examine the link between alcohol consumption patterns and the risk of developing diabetes in the Danish population. The researchers analyzed responses from a total of 70,551 participants (41,847 women and 28,704 men) without diabetes. All the participants had answered questions about health and lifestyle and provided detailed reports abouts their alcohol drinking habits.

The participants were keenly followed until 2012 (for an average of 4.9 years) during which the researchers found out from the national diabetes register that 87 women and 859 men had developed diabetes.

Yes – The Types of alcoholic Drink Matters!

From the information, the researchers also determined drinking patterns, average weekly intake, consumption of different beverages and binge drinking. The team asked participants about their consumption patterns of specific types of beverages and their frequency of consuming alcohol.

Therefore, the researchers were able to classify participants into categories:

  • current and lifetime abstainers;
  • people who drank on 5 to 7 days each week;
  • on 3 to 4 days per week;
  • on 1 to 2 days each week;
  • and on less than 1 day each week.

A standard alcoholic drink in Denmark contains 12 grams of pure alcohol. This is less than the standard drink in the U.S which is 0.6 ounces (14 grams) of ethanol. The team also assessed binge drinking (drinking 5 or more drinks in one session). Binge drinking was classified into 3 categories:

  • more than one day per week,
  • less than 1 day per week,
  • and never.

The team also categorized drinking patterns for 3 types of alcoholic drinks: spirits, beer and wine. These drinks were assessed as: 7 or more drinks per week; between 1 and 6 drinks per week; and less than 1 drink each week. However, for men this category was further divided into: 7 to 13 drinks per week, and 14 or more alcoholic drinks each week.

When analyzing the data to determine the link with diabetes, the team adjusted the information to make allowance for the effect of other aspects that might influence it. Some of these factors include:

  • sex,
  • age,
  • smoking,
  • education level,
  • BMI (Body Mass Index),
  • blood pressure (previous or current),
  • leisure activities,
  • family history of diabetes,
  • and type of diet (such as fiber levels, fish, vegetables and fruit).

The study showed that participants who consumed moderate amounts of alcohol in terms of average consumption per week had the lowest diabetes risk.

Women who drank 9 drinks per week had a 58% lower risk of developing diabetes, and men who consumed an average of 14 alcoholic drinks each week had 43% lower diabetes risk compared with abstainers.

After analyzing drinking patterns, the researchers also found that participants who drank alcohol on three to four days each week had the lowest risk of diabetes. For women, the risk of developing diabetes was 32% lower and for men it was 27% lower compared with participants who only consumed alcohol on less than one day per week.

However, analysis of binge drinking data did not show any clear link to the risk of developing diabetes. The Danish researchers say that this might be due to the low number of participants who actually reported binge drinking. This made it difficult for the team to produce meaningful statistical result.

So – Which Alcoholic Drink is Best for Diabetes?               

WINE

When it comes to the type of alcoholic drink, just as previous studies have found out, the team also discovered that high to moderate wine consumption is linked to a significantly lower diabetes risk.

They attributed this to the fact that red wine contains polyphenols, which help control blood sugar.

Compared with consuming less than one each week, drinking at least 7 drinks of wine per week is linked to a 25% to 30% lower risk of diabetes.

BEER

On the other hand, in terms of drinking beer, the study showed that men who drink between 1 and 6 per week had a 21% lower risk of diabetes, compared with men who drink less than one drink per week. However, for women, the study showed no ties to the risk of diabetes.

SPIRITS

In terms of spirit consumption, the team established that there’s no significant tie between the amount of spirits men drank and the risk of developing diabetes. The study also found that women who consume 7 or more drinks of spirits each week had an 83% higher risk of diabetes compared with those who had less than one drink each week.

These finding suggest that the frequency of drinking alcohol is linked with the risk of developing diabetes. Moreover, consuming alcohol over 3 to 4 days is linked with the lowest diabetes risk.

Learn more about Alcohol and Diabetes!

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Diabetes Care: Diet And Exercising Habits Are A Must For Diabetics

How Does Exercise Help Type 2 Diabetes?

Exercise is good for us all – especially those with diabetes. With the correct amount of exercise to suit the individual and a sensible diet, there would be many type 2 diabetics out there that could avoid taking medication altogether!

There is no denying the importance of exercise for keeping healthy if you have diabetes. Exercise is vital for both Type 1 and type 2 diabetics helping the body to:

  • Respond better to insulin and reduce the amount of medication they take.
  • To keep circulation healthy in their arms and legs
  • To reduce their risk of depression
  • To keep their metabolism healthy and their muscles strong- this in turn helps with maintaining a healthy weight. Strong muscles also help to maintain independence with age.

What Exercise is Good for Diabetes?

How does exercise help wtih type 2 diabetesIf you have diabetes and you haven’t exercised for a while, you need to take it slow. OK so you can go out and hire a personal trainer, or even join the local gym but to be honest it’s really not necessary. Don’t over think this – there’s easier and cheaper ways out there that you can get all the exercise you need.

  • Good old fashioned walking. All you really need is some comfortable clothing and a good pair of walking shoes! And if you are lucky enough to live close by a beach, you don’t even need the shoes!
  • Always good to take it easy to start – even just 20 or 30 minutes per day – 5 days a week if you can manage it. This is going to help you see improvements in your haemoglobin A1C, your triglycerides and cholesterol. As you gradually build this up to 90 minutes per day, you really start to see the difference that exercise makes to your life. How you feel, how you look and even blood pressure!
  • Swimming is also another ideal exercise for people with Type 2 diabetes. Some diabetics also experience other conditions, like arthritis which can often make other forms of exercise painful and uncomfortable. Being in the water is less stressful for your body as it doesn’t put pressure on your joints. It’s also much easier on your feet. Swimming is great for weight loss and diabetes is quite often a factor with regards to obesity.

Exercise and Diabetes Prevention – Make Exercise a Habit!

If you have diabetes, you will certainly need to look at how you incorporate exercise into your daily life now. You need to make exercise a habit, that will in time become part of your life.  If you find it difficult to get out to a park or beach to go walking, or you’re just not really into going to gyms, then perhaps have a look at all the FREE Apps  that are available for your smart phone or Tablet!  I love the 7 minute workout apps, and even the gentle stretching sessions that you can actually do just about anywhere!  How about getting some diabetic exercise videos – or even getting into some gentle yoga exercise for diabetes.

Getting your daily dose of regular exercise doesn’t have to be expensive or that time consuming – you just have to commit to making it part of your daily life routine!

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Will There Be a Diabetes Apple Watch?

Apple Has A Top-secret Team Working On The Next Version Of The Diabetes Watch

Over the last decade, we have witnessed an acceleration of modern technological advances especially for people suffering from diabetes, a medical condition that affects over 30 million Americans.

These advances are promising diabetes patients,

  • fewer injections,
  • less pains,
  • less worry and
  • less mental math about managing this condition.

Blood Glucose Monitoring Watch These new systems provide real time and more accurate information on blood glucose through built-in clinical support algorithms, apps, automated insulin delivery and wireless technology that reduce diabetes complications and the burden in general.

Apple Hires a Secret Team to Develop New Diabetes Treatment System

According to CNBC, AAPL (Apple) has hired a team of biomedical engineers to work on a sensor that will detect blood sugar levels, sparking reports of the company embedding the new sensors into wearable devices that could potentially be “must haves” for diabetes patients. However, it could be a long time before this new technology is actually available on the market. This initiative was envisioned by Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, to develop a sensor that can continuously and non-invasively monitor blood glucose levels to better treat diabetes.

There are some recent successes: CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitoring) systems including the Dexcom G5 Mobile continuous Glucose Monitoring System. This system uses a sensor through a very tiny catheter that is usually slipped just under the patient’s skin in order to provide glucose readings every five minutes. The sensor transmits information wirelessly to a stand-alone smartphone or receiver to alert the patient of downward or upward trends in their blood glucose so they can take appropriate pre-emptive action.

If successful, this revolutionary initiative by Apple could help diabetes patients turn various devices such as the Apple Watch into essential must haves. The breakthrough might be a holy grail for diabetes patients because many life sciences organizations have tried to no avail. Tracking blood sugar levels accurately and non-invasively has proven to be highly challenging. However, According to people familiar with the matter, Apple has been carrying out feasibility trials and has hired a team of consultants to figure out the proper regulatory pathways.

The initiative has been going on for more than five years. Steve Jobs envisioned a wearable device like the Smart watch being used to accurately monitor vitals such as blood glucose, heart rate and oxygen levels. Apple quietly acquired Cor in 2010 after the then CEO Bob Mersserschmidit sent Steve a cold email about sensor technologies for human health and wellness. However, Bob later joined Steve jobs’ Apple Watch team.

The team reports to Apple’s vice president of hardware technology, Johny Srouji. As of a year ago, about 30 people were reportedly working in this group. However, it is speculated that about a dozen experts from companies such as Sano, Masimo, C Vital Connect, C8 Medisensors and Medtronic have joined this secretive group while others joined the team dedicated to the Apple Watch.

The Diabetes Apple Watch Faces An Uphill Battle

According to three people familiar with the matter, Apple is dedicated to developing an optical sensor which will measure indications of blood glucose by simply shining a light through the patient’s skin. John L. Smith described this as one of the most difficult technical challenges he has ever encountered in his career. The process has been littered with failures but this has not stopped companies from attempting to crack this lucrative yet elusive opportunity.

Terrace Gregg, Dexcom Executive chairman told Reuters that to succeed, companies would incur several hundred dollars. However, the breakthrough would me a huge advantage for millions of people suffering from diabetes, open up potential channels for patients to track their blood glucose and spur new medical research. The Apple Watch would provide an easier and more convenient way for consumers to track their blood glucose.

However Apple is not the only company eying the elusive opportunities in this field. Google’s life sciences team, Verily, is also working on a smart contact lens that will measure blood glucose through the eye. In 2015, the team also partnered with Dexcom to develop a device no bigger than the normal bandage that measures blood glucose.

According to the report by CNBC, Apple has hired an anonymous office away from its headquarters for biomedical engineers to work in total secret. The report also indicates that the team has been so successful it’s already conducting trials of the new sensor at various clinical sites in the Bay Area, San Francisco. The team’s recent success is the main reason why Apple has hired consultants to navigate the process of getting approval by the FDA.

One of the practical issues the team aims to overcome is the fact that reading blood glucose using optical issues is hard. On the other hand, there are numerous companies that have tried using non-invasive monitoring for blood glucose and failed. For instance, HealBe’s Go Be promised to count calorie intake non-invasively and failed terribly.

Right now, inserting a sensor just below the skin is the only effective way of continuously monitoring your blood sugar level. Continuous blood glucose monitors use internal sensors that connect with external transmitters that are often held, for example, on the thigh, tricep or stomach. Even wearables such as the KTrack use very tiny needles that are burrowed into the patient’s skin.

Statistics from the WHO (World Health Organization) show that there are more than 422 million diabetes patients in the world. That is up from about 10 million in 1980, a very sharp increase for a condition that is know to be one of the leading causes of kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and blindness. Moreover, more than 4 million deaths per year are directly related to complications with diabetes . Therefore, if Apple can innovate, where so many companies have failed, then it will undoubtedly make the number of consumers willing to buy the Blood Glucose Monitoring Watch, increase exponentially!

Turn your Smart Phone into a Smart Blood Glucose Meter!

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New Dario Glucose Meter: Blood Glucose Monitoring System

Turn your Smart Phone into a Smart Blood Glucose Meter!

The Dario Smart Blood Glucose Monitoring System integrates with your smartphone directly allowing you to monitor and track your blood glucose and other important elements, on your phone. This all-in-one system from LabStyle Innovations was launched internationally in 2013 and has been under review by the FDA since then. Dario was given the go ahead by the FDA in December 2015 and it hit the U.S market in mid May 2016.This system is a sleek plastic device that’s about the size of the normal cigarette lighter with a cartridge of 25 strips housed on top and a lancet built into the bottom.

Technical specifications

  • Blood sample size: Minimum of 0.3 microlitres
  • Time to process and display results: 6 seconds
  • Memory: Limited to phone/device memory
  • Batteries: not required
  • Averages: 7, 14, or 30 days
  • Hematocrit range: 20 to 60%
  • Measurement range 0.6 to 33.3 mmol/L
  • Weight: 40 grams
  • Operating temperature: 50° to 113°F (10° to 45°C)
  • Storage temperature: 36° to 90°F (2° to 32°C)
  • Altitude: up to 3,400 meters
  • Dimensions: 104 x 21 x 11mm.

Explore the Features of the Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System

  1. All-in-one Glucose Monitoring System

Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring

Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System

There are two main things that make the Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System stand out from other systems. The first reason is that it turns your smart phone into the glucose meter. The second is that the test strip and lancet holder are combined into one, convenient, easy to use and well-designed device. It is ideal for keeping things discrete because nobody would actually guess that it’s actually a glucose meter.

  1. The lancet/needle

The lancet that is housed on one end of the all-in-one device can be accessed by simply snapping off the orange piece. You can also set the needle’s depth, and then pull down the back piece in order to load the needle before pressing the button (orange button) to release it.

  1. Test strips

Test strips are stored on the opposite end of the device. Therefore, there’s no need to carry around several pieces. Moreover, the cartridge that contains 25 test strips simply snaps into place and you just need to remove the white piece you’ll find at the end. The device comes with two test strip cartridges and each cartridge contains 25 test strips.

  1. Meter attachment

The Dario Smart Blood Glucose Monitoring System turns your smartphone into a blood glucose testing meter by simply plugging in a very small attachment into the phone’s headphone jack. The meter attachment is also conveniently stored in the compact all-in-one device.

  1. The meter

The packing clearly explains how users can download the app and set it up on their phones. You can test your blood sugar by simply plugging in the attachment and opening the app. The device will prompt you to carefully insert a new testing strip before placing a drop of blood on the strip. The meter will count down by first filling in a circle before it displays the glucose level. The device uses a color coding system to show if the glucose level is within range, high or within the borderline. It will then take you to a new screen where you’re required to indicate whether it’s a bedtime, pre-meal or post-meal reading and then enter additional information related to physical activity,  insulin, carbs and even tags.

  1. App-Tracking and Analytics

The Dario app is easy to use and very intuitive. It logs important data and then displays it in a clear and meaningful way to the end user. You can also set up your own personal profile which mainly includes the type of bolus/basal medication you use, your blood glucose thresholds and hyper/hypo warnings. Moreover, you can set reminders, track food, and sync fitness apps.

  1. Logbook and Charts

The app is designed to automatically store all readings in the logbook. You can also choose if you want to view it as a chart, timeline, or list. The chart graphs up the last 14 days and you can share your logbook as a CSV or PDF file with your phone contacts or even by entering an email address.

  1. On-Demand Sharing

The app also lets you chart more including carbohydrate intake, calories and insulin doses and the results can be shared with anyone such as your doctor or family. Moreover, the statistics tab generally gives you a summary for a day, or the last week (7 days), month (30 days), or 90 days. This summary tells you the number of readings you had, the highest or lowest reading and then breaks the data down by how many readings were in range, average or below and then by how many hypers or hypos you had based on your custom settings. You can also click the summary box to see all the readings that fall into that specific category.

  1. Emergency Hypo Alerts

This is an additional safety feature that once enabled on your device; Dario sends a text message to 4 people with your current blood glucose level and a link to where you are using your device’s GPS coordinates. This feature is ideal for people who have or had hypo problems in the past because they can go anywhere at any time with peace of mind.

What are the Benefits of Dairo Smart Blood Glucose Monitoring System?

  • This is one of the latest blood testing meters and everything in the system fits perfectly together. Therefore, instead of carrying around your pouch with separate pieces (lancing device, test strips, meters, etc), all you really need is one compact device and your phone
  • The device is great when it comes to logging everything making your data super convenient to share.
  • You don’t have to worry about charging your meter because the device will work as long as your phone does not run out of charge.
  • The Dario Smart Meter is very small and compact. The case dimensions are 104mm x 21mm x 11mm. This includes the lancing device, test strips and the meter itself.
  • The device is compatible with both android (OS 4.12 or higher) and iOS devices (OS 6.1 or higher)

Drawbacks

  • The device does not sync with other diabetic devices.

Is the The Dario Smart Blood Glucose Monitoring System for me?

If you’re looking for a system that is compact and allows users to log readings directly to their phones, this device is a great option!

For the Latest Bloodless Glucose Meter Options – Click here!

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Exenatide For Type 2 Diabetes

Exenatide is an injectable type 2 diabetes medication that is used along with exercise and diet in order to control the blood glucose level. It stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin efficiently when your blood glucose level is high. Exenatide also causes a significant decrease in appetite by slowing the emptying of your stomach. However, Exenatide should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes.

Using medication and making lifestyle changes such as exercising, dieting and quitting smoking will help you improve your health and manage your diabetes. This will also decrease the chances of having a stroke, heart attack and other diabetes related complications including nerve damage, kidney failure, gum disease, and eye problems. Your health care providers will advise you on the best way you can manage your diabetes.

When to Avoid Exenatide for Diabetes.

  • You should not use Exenatide if you are on dialysis or if you have severe kidney disease, diabetic ketoacidosis or if you have slowed digestion.
  • Exenetide should not be used together with Bydureon and short-acting or fast-acting insulin.

Is Exenatide Safe?  You should tell your health care provider if you have:

  • High triglycerides
  • A history of kidney transplant or kidney disease
  • A history of gall stones or pancreatitis
  • Digestion problems
  • A history of alcoholism

Birth control pills should be taken at least 1 hour before taking this medication.  You should also tell your doctors if you are pregnant, plan on becoming pregnant or become pregnant while using Exenatide.

Exenetide is not approved for use by people younger than 18 years.

How should I use Exenetide?

Exenatide immediate release, which is also known as Byetta, comes as a liquid (solution) in a prefilled injection pen for injecting subcutaneously.

Exenatide extended release (Bydureon) (long-acting) comes in powder form which is mixed with liquid in a prefilled injection pen or a vial to inject subcutaneously.

Exenatide immediate release (Byetta) should be injected twice per day within one hour before breakfast and dinner. It should not be injected before meals and your doses should be at least six hours apart. The doctor might start you on a low dosage and may switch you to a higher dosage of Exenatide if your blood glucose control does not improve after using the initial dosage for one month. The doctor might also adjust the dosage to make sure you have the best results.

Exenatide extended release solution should be injected once per week, on the same day each week without regard to meals. Use Exenatide exactly as instructed by your doctor.

Diabetics who use Exenatide immediate release need to purchase needles separately. Your doctor will tell you the needles you should use to inject the medication. Always look at your medication before injecting it. Exenatide should be as fluid, colorless and clear as water.  Do not use Exenatide in smaller or larger amounts or for longer than prescribed. Exenatide is injected under the skin and your doctor or pharmacist should show you how injections are used and how used syringes and needles should be disposed. Exenatide (Byetta) comes in a prefilled dosing pen with a user manual showing detailed instructions for using the injection pen.

Never share a cartridge, syringe or injection pen with anyone else since this can allow diseases or infections to pass from one person to the other.

Exenatide Dosage Information:

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you’ve not yet eaten a meal, take the missed dose immediately. However, if it’s almost time for your next dose, or if you’ve already eaten, skip the dose you’ve missed.

What should I do if I overdose?

Seek medical attention immediately.  Exenatide overdose can cause nausea, vomiting and signs of low blood sugar such as feeling shaky, dizziness, headache irritability and hunger.

What are the side effects of Exenatide?

Stop using Exenatide and seek medical help if you have:

  • Low blood sugar: sweating, irritability, feeling anxious and shaky, dizziness, hunger and fast heart rate.
  • Kidney problems: Difficult or painful urination, little or no urination, swelling in your ankles or feet, short of breath or feeling tired.
  • Pancreatitis: Severe nausea and vomiting, severe pain in the upper stomach spreading to the back, or fast heart rate.
  • Feeling jittery and weak
  • Constipation, diarrhea, heart burn.

Seek emergency medical help if you notice any signs of allergic reaction to Exenatide; rapid heartbeats, hives, difficult breathing, feeling light headed, itching, and swelling of the face, throat, tongue or lips.

What drugs that can affect Exenatide?

Your doctor might recommend that you stop using:

  • Birth control pills
  • Antibiotics
  • Blood pressure medication
  • Pain medication
  • Oral diabetes medicine or insulin
  • Warfarin (Jantoven, Coumadin)

Exenatide might make it difficult for the body to absorb oral medication. Therefore, it is vital to tell your physician about all the medication you are taking including herbal products for Diabetes, vitamins and over-the-counter medicines.

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How To Help a Diabetic Child Live a Normal Life

How do I help my Child with Diabetes?

Having childhood diabetes  is a tough road to have to travel, for both the Child and for the family who loves that child! It will be a real shock for you at first, however you and your family will learn to adjust to living with Diabetes. Thankfully you can make it a little easier by planning ahead and speaking openly to your child and others about their disease. How to help a diabetic child live a normal lifeThe child has nothing to be embarrassed about, and this issue should not be hidden. In fact, hiding it can be a lot more dangerous than letting everyone know, plus being open will make your child feel more normal rather than as if they have a bad secret to keep. You should still encourage your child to strive to achieve their highest goals – there are so many celebrities, rock stars, Olympic athletes and sports men and women who live with diabetes.

Plan Ahead

Every day has to be planned ahead to include meals, snacks, testing, and injections. For small children there are risks all over the place in terms of food that they cannot have. Because of this, it’s important to let your child have some planned treats occasionally so they don’t feel left out. The truth is, what’s good for your diabetic child is also good for other children.

Diabetic Kids – They’re Not That Different

Children should eat a healthy, balanced diet, stay hydrated with non-sugar sweetened beverages and get plenty of activity each day. Childhood diabetesThe only difference is that your child will need to monitor their blood sugar, and take breaks to either give themselves insulin or take medication. Oftentimes this means an adult will need to assist them.

Help your Diabetic Child by Talking to Teachers

Teachers and administrators need to know everything they can about your child’s condition. Some schools today do not have nurses on staff. Sometimes, if your child is not on a pump and you can’t leave work to administer insulin injections, the teacher will be the one to do it and it’ll be up to you to train them how to do it appropriately. Plan to spend a day or two at your child’s school so that you can go through every procedure, and watch them do it as well so that you can feel assured.

School Lunch Ideas for Kids with Diabetes.

There are so many choices really, for school lunches for Diabetic children.  Actually, it’s probably no different than what an ‘ideal’ lunch box for anyone should look like!  You need to pack fun and healthy foods that will give them enough energy to get through the day – and to help manage their blood sugar levels. Here are a few examples :

  • Hard cooked eggs
  • Rice or pasta, with some grilled chicken or fish
  • Some cubed ham or turkey, with some dipping sauces
  • Hummus with some pita bread
  • Salads with some grilled chicken
  • Baby carrots
  • Cubes of low fat cheese.
  • Yoghurt with some sliced pear
  • Crackers
  • Seedless Grapes
  • Vegetable sticks like celery, carrot or cucumber, with some hummus to dip in
  • Wrap some thin sliced roast beef, around veges, or breadsticks

Dealing with Other Children, when your child has Diabetes

How to help a diabetic child live a normal lifeIf your child has diabetes, the best way to deal with other children is to make them part of helping your child stay safe and healthy. Offer to teach your child’s class about diabetes. Bring a fun interactive presentation and make your child feel special. A nice party with appropriate and healthy food to top it off will help. This will certainly make your child feel just like all the other children in their class

 Set a Good Example for your Child with Diabetes.

Don’t eat foods in front of your child that they cannot have. Don’t have food around the house that your child cannot have. Live a healthy life along with your child, and let your home be your child’s safe place away from temptations and the feeling of being left out. It’s not right to have those things around or at the dinner table if your one of your children can’t have them.

Most children with diabetes will live long lives and maintain their health as long as they’re taught how to care for themselves appropriately. Pay attention to their meals, calculate and teach them to calculate their carbohydrates, and ensure that they get their insulin on time in accurate dosages every single day!

More information here about the Recent FDA Approval on the Bloodless Glucose Meter.

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Top 4 Diabetic Lotions to Help Increase Circulation.

Best Lotions for Diabetic Feet

Diabetes can cause deprivation of oxygen to your skin, leading to poor circulation that might lead to severe, chronic dryness, slow healing, redness, cracking and itching. This basically means that diabetics can get injured more easily and are more likely to get infections that take longer to heal. Here are some of the best lotions for diabetic feet that can help alleviate these diabetes complications:

  1. Neoteric Advanced Healing Cream

Neoteric advanced healing cream provides treatment for cracked, damaged and chronic dry skin. One of its main ingredients is TriOxygenc which helps infuse oxygen into your skin. This diabetic skin care cream is proven to speed healing and increase circulation by strengthening natural defenses of the skin. It provides instant soothing action by quickly restoring your skin to a healthier, smooth soft texture.

Main benefits

  • diabetic skin care lotionsEspecially great for feet and hands
  • Speeds healing by strengthening the natural defenses of the skin
  • Protects and restores chronic dry, damaged, cracked skin
  • Helps increase the skin’s natural collagen production and circulation
  • Promotes, healthier, stronger, more resilient skin
  • Provides therapeutic skin moisturization and protection
  • Non-greasy
  • Absorbs very easily

Best Cream for Diabetic Feet

Neoteric advanced healing cream provides exceptional skin care for people with all types of dry skin conditions including diabetes.

How to use

Apply as often as necessary or as directed by the healthcare expert or physician. Daily use is recommended to help maintain the skin’s soft, healthy appearance.

  1. Gold Bond Ultimate Hydrating Lotion – Diabetic Skin Care Lotions

With diabetes, your skin can become rough, cracked and uncomfortable. Gold bond ultimate hydrating lotion is specifically formulated for dry skin with hydralast and seven intensive moisturizers to hydrate and soothe the skin while adding a strong protective layer of moisture for up to 24 hours. Gold bond ultimate hydrating lotion is ideal for daily use and does not contain any harsh alpha hydroxyl acids that irritate the skin.

  • Foot Creams For Diabetic NeuropathyIdeal for all over body use
  • Contains aloe and essential vitamins that moisturize and nourish dry, flaky skin
  • Keeps the skin feeling and looking noticeably healthy
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Fragrance free
  • Exclusive formula that is dermatologist tested

Diabetic Cream for Feet

How to use

Apply Gold bond ultimate hydrating lotion liberally to rough, dry and problem skin areas to speed up moisturization.

  1. Eucerin Diabetics’ Skin Relief Body Lotion

Eucerin diabetics’ dry skin relief lotion is specifically designed to leave the skin feeling comfortable, hydrated and healthier all day long. This unique, non-greasy formula is enriched with alpha hydroxyl which repairs and exfoliates dry, flaky skin. Besides smoothening dry, rough skin, Eucerin diabetics’ skin relief body lotion noticeably improves overall skin condition and appearance just after one use! It is designed to repair, enhance and protect your skin, giving you the confidence that comes from healthy-looking and radiant skin.

Benefits

  • Diabetic Lotions to Help Increase CirculationThe alpha hydroxyl formula smoothens rough, dry skin after just one use
  • Fast absorbing and lightweight
  • Fragrance free
  • Clinically proven formulation that provides 24-hour moisture
  • Paraben free
  • Dermatologist recommended brand

How to use

Apply liberally over rough, dry skin every day or as recommended by the physician. Apply immediately after showering or bathing for best results.

  1. DiabetAid Pain and Tingling Relief Lotion

Diabetes can cause two main problems that hurt your legs and feet. One complication is damage to the nerves which leads to an infection or a sore. The other problem is blood flow which can make it hard for an infection or sore to heal. However, if you check for sores or cut sand wash your feet and hands with mild soap, chances of infections are greatly reduced. Sometimes you may also feel a tingling sensation in your hands and feet. Applying DiabetAid pain and Tingling Relief Lotion will relieve those uncomfortable sensations.

Benefits

  • Lotion That Helps CirculationSoothing relief for uncomfortable tingling in the feet and hands
  • Contains 4 essential moisturizers to relieve dry, rough skin
  • Does not contain any ingredients that are considered harmful or dangerous to diabetics.

How to use

Apply to affected areas daily but you should avoid applying more than 4 times per day. Children under 2 years should consult a doctor for directions and recommendations.

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